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Taking stock of the Macri energy reform agenda. Tariffs and subsidy reduction.

By: Ganem, Carlos Abi.
Publisher: Institute of the Americas Description: 22 p. ilus.Subject(s): Energía - Subsidios | Gas Natural - Subsidios | ArgentinaDDC classification: 333.823.3 Online resources: Click here to access online | Click here to access online Summary: One of the biggest challenges that the Macri administration faced when it took office in December 2015, was to tackle subsidies (especially in energy) without producing a social disturbance. Confronting subsidies was particularly urgent and challenging as it had to be done in a context of historically high tax burden, growing fiscal deficit of about 6% of GDP, a poverty rate around 30% and one of highest inflation rates in the world. The broader efforts aimed at normalization of the energy sector were critical particularly because of the strategic importance that a competitive, self-supplied energy market has at a political, economic and social level. The urgency was even more pronounced in the case of natural gas, given that although the electricity network has greater coverage in terms of area and users, about 80% of the generation of electricity is produced by natural gas turbines, making Argentina highly dependent on this hydrocarbon.
List(s) this item appears in: Publicaciones Mayo 2018
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One of the biggest challenges that the Macri administration faced when it took office in December 2015, was to tackle subsidies (especially in energy) without producing a social disturbance. Confronting subsidies was particularly urgent and challenging as it had to be done in a context of historically high tax burden, growing fiscal deficit of about 6% of GDP, a poverty rate around 30% and one of highest inflation rates in the world. The broader efforts aimed at normalization of the energy sector were critical particularly because of the strategic importance that a competitive, self-supplied energy market has at a political, economic and social level. The urgency was even more pronounced in the case of natural gas, given that although the electricity network has greater coverage in terms of area and users, about 80% of the generation of electricity is produced by natural gas turbines, making Argentina highly dependent on this hydrocarbon.

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